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Venezuela’s Biggest Morgue Is Now Fenced Off from Reporters

By: Sabrina Martín - @SabrinaMartinR - Aug 5, 2016, 11:40 am
Reporters of print, audiovisual and digital media protest outside the Bello Monte morgue in Caracas, by the fence installed on the perimeter. (Effect Cocuyo)

Reporters of print, audiovisual and digital media protest outside the Bello Monte morgue in Caracas, by the fence installed on the perimeter. (Efecto Cocuyo)

EspañolOne of the largest morgues in Venezuela has reportedly been fenced off to prevent journalists from finding out how many people have recently died, and by what cause.

Because Venezuela doesn’t release reliable crime rate statistics, the media uses the morgue as a way to interview the victims of families as well as to get a more accurate body count.

Reporters from print, broadcast and digital media gathered around the Bello Monte morgue in Caracas on Wednesday, August 3 to protest the installation of the new perimeter.

The protest was led by Secretary General of the Press Union Workers Marco Ruiz, who requested that the Inspector Yazmín Jaramillo interview with Director of the National Service of Medicine and Forensic Sciences Giovanny Peña for the purpose of coordinating a way to allow the media to continue to cover stories related to deaths.

Ruiz said a cameraman was warned he should not shoot the office, and a journalist was prevented from interviewing relatives of a victim.

Morgue workers told reporters to start an investigation into on how much money was invested in the installation of the fence.

# LaCercaNoEvitaCrímenes The Fence Doesn’t Stop Crimes

Social media exploded following the fence installation outside the morgue, as Venezuelans claimed censorship and fencing will not prevent crimes from being committed, especially in the most violent city in one of the most violent countries.

Despite the fence in the Bello Monte Morgue we won’t stop reporting about homicides. The fence doesn’t stop crimes.

Unusual, incredible, madness to prevent access of journalists to the Morgue. Know that the fence doesn’t stop crimes.

The fence doesn’t stop crimes. Instead of fencing, they’ll have to build a wall in the morgue, bccause numbers will continue to come out.

In the seven months of 2016, 3,362 corpses have been sent to the morgue in Bello Monte, many of them from violent causes.

July saw the entry of 535 bodies, the second highest figure behind only the 569 bodies taken to the medical examiner in December 2013.

Source: El Nacional

Sabrina Martín Sabrina Martín

Sabrina Martín is a Venezuelan journalist, commentator, and editor based in Valencia with experience in corporate communication. Follow @SabrinaMartinR.