“It’s More Difficult to Come Out of The Closet as Conservative Than as Gay.”

Supposed defenders of diversity impose a single line of thought, and being conservative is not among the options.

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It’s more difficult to come out of the closet as conservative than as gay (PanAm Post).

Spanish – Dismissals, social ostracism, and a beauty queen stripped of her crown are the consequences of “coming out of the closet as a conservative,” say those who have suffered.

Today, homosexuality is widely accepted in western societies. It is not only easy to come out of the closet as gay; the announcement is often applauded. At the same time, the opposite happens when people admit that their political leanings are not “progressive.”

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The left collectivizes people, thus denying individuals their free thought.

For example, Hollywood figures questioned the event of Black Trump supporters at a recent pro-Trump event. They alleged that the sympathizers had been paid to attend and even used racial epithets to refer to them.

“The left wants you to look different, but think the same.”

Media figure Ricky Rebel, a gay singer who has performed alongside Madonna and Britney Spears, among others, appeared at the Grammy Awards in an outfit campaigning for Donald Trump.

Browsing through social media, you will see the insults hurled against him by those who display the LGBT pride flag.

Rebel is a staunch defender of the wall on the border with Mexico and has participated in private fundraising campaigns for its construction.

During the annual U.S. convention, he told reporters that it is more difficult to come out of the closet as a conservative than as gay and that in conservative circles he is not judged by his personal preferences, while in left-wing spaces do not tolerate dissent.

Rebel argues that the increasingly socialist left does not tolerate entrepreneurs like him who defend the free market and get ahead on their own, but instead wants people to act in herds, according to their race, gender, or sexual identification.

Censorship of Chinese Migrant Beauty Queen

Another case of censorship is that of Kathy Zhu. Zhu, who was born in China, received an email from the U.S. Miss World organization warning her that in the light of her “refusal to try on a hijab” – the veil that covers Muslim women – they were taking away her crown. She had won the contest as the most beautiful woman in the state where she lives.

Zhu published the email exchange where she assures that if she had refused to try on the catholic rosary, not the hijab, no one would bat an eyelid.

While in Iran, homosexuality is punishable by death and hanging, and there is a women’s movement that removes the veil as an act of freedom, since its use is mandatory and removing it puts them at risk of prison. In the U.S. the feminist movement uses it as an “empowering” symbol and by questioning its use deprives a beauty queen of her title.

Furthermore, this case exposes growing censorship and limitation of freedom of expression. Zhu was stripped of her crown because of a comment she made outside the competition in her private life, years earlier.

As a result of this incident, Zhu boosted her activism and highlighted the hypocrisy behind what supposedly tolerant people tolerate, as they use racist epithets while claiming to fight racism.

Zhu questions how Congresswoman Ilhan Omar, the first U.S. legislator to be elected to the parliament wearing an Islamic veil, can freely announce that people in the U.S. “should be afraid of white men.” Zhu reflects on this and asks us to “imagine the indignation” that would follow if someone said, “we should be afraid of Black men.”

This is something Kathy Zhu had criticized since she was 18 when she appeared publicly in 2016 backing President Trump’s candidacy with the “Chinese for Trump” jersey.

She claims her classmates were “going with the flow,” while she decided to be informed and chose to appear in a video titled “Why this 18-year-old girl will vote for Trump.”

There are abundant cases where supposed defenders of diversity impose a single line of thought, and being a conservative is not one of the options.

Some rebels choose to speak out

An iconic case is Rob Smith, a black, gay conservative, who condemns how the Democratic Party uses black people to get votes.

The term “plantation politics” is used in this respect to describing how the Democratic Party keeps the black population in a state of slavery. Instead of being confined to a plantation, as was the case centuries ago, they are now dependent on the state through subsidies.

In other words, instead of encouraging prosperity, it generates a perpetual dependency in exchange for an assured vote.

Journalist Doug Mainwaring, who is a columnist for pro-life website LifeSiteNews, recounts his experience.

Mainwaring describes that when he came out as gay after he had an affair with a prominent Republican from Washington and experienced first-hand the tolerance and compassion of conservatives. He asserts that progressives only use minorities so long as they are useful to them, and berate those who think differently.

Today, the supposed defenders of diversity, paradoxically, glorify the intolerance of different opinions and invade private life through cultural relativism.

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