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The Bolivarian Myopia of the Capitalist as Crook

By: Joel Fensch - Sep 4, 2014, 1:07 pm

EspañolThe regents of the Venezuelan economy over the last 15 years have based their planning on the perception that everyone in the private sector is a crook. Crooks need to be scrutinized and controlled to ensure their corrupt practices stay clear of the people’s well-being. From this premise is derived the massive number of controls, permissions, official seals, procedures, and licenses that have become necessary in order to do business in Venezuela or from Venezuela.

A case in point is the exchange control which now dates back more than 12 years. In the beginning, there was a legitimate reason for the controls, given the backlash of a banking crisis at the onset of the new government. However, more than an economic tool, it became a political tool. Those in power used it to guide infidels toward becoming acquainted with and accepting the socialist agenda, so as to be favored with hard currency for imports of raw materials and/or services.

Chávez of Venezuela explains how some are more equal than others.
“Remember, all bourgeoisie are equal, but some are more equal than others.” (@EduardoIlustrado)

In that time, the country has been the victim of a corruption tsunami that has created mind-boggling fortunes, crippled the government’s capacity to function, and brought the private sector to its knees. As if that were not enough, all this has condemned the common Venezuelan, who began with limited options to escape from the clutches of poverty. He now must remain in his place and enjoy the additional perks relating to shortages of basic foods, medicines, and services.

In all the years of our imperfect democracy, Venezuela has not seen the likes of this insane quest to become another Cuba. Despite the unfavorable results of this political experiment, the thirst to remain in power has not been quenched and oddly enough 30 percent of the people remain committed to the “movement.” These believers are most likely those who have not yet had the good fortune of benefiting from this distorted bonanza and who dare not speak out lest they be stricken from the insider list.

So time plays against the revolution, and one hopes sooner rather than later. One good morning they’ll open up the vault to find nothing left and discover, much to everyone’s lament, that what has occurred is precisely the opposite of a wide distribution of wealth.

So who are the crooks?

Joel Fensch Joel Fensch

Editor of InsightSur, Fensch covers geopolitical and historical events in Latin America with the PanAm Post.