The Coronavirus Has Screwed My Life

We cannot continue to allow the expansion of governments that suppress the truth because no matter how much we want to avoid it, the consequences could end up blowing up in our faces one day, ruining our lives, or worse, leading us to death.

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Man disinfecting surfaces (EFE).

We cannot continue to allow the expansion of governments that suppress the truth because no matter how much we want to avoid it, the consequences could end up blowing up in our faces one day, ruining our lives, or worse, leading us to death.

We are living through difficult times, times that mark milestones in humanity. For some, they create ample space for reflection, while for others, they cause internal disasters, small bombs of human degeneration, which explode that dark side that had been hidden for years. Then episodes of domestic violence arise, drug addictions reappear, or simply fears and insecurities for the unforeseeable future take hold of the individual’s psyche and drive him or her out of it.

In China, officials of a totalitarian regime decided to silence a doctor who was speaking the truth. Other bureaucrats closer to Xi Jinping decided that this should be the state policy. The president accompanied them on the path of censorship, asking the directors of the WHO, led by an African man, to endorse his “information” to allow the flow of the disease. Suddenly a man died in Italy, a woman in Spain, another human in the United States, and so the deaths doubled, quintupled daily, until they reached the point of being grateful to be alive, even though those who still breathe the coronavirus have had their dreams taken away from them.

The catastrophe factor is not an objective measure of the ferocity with which the coronavirus attempted to kill everyone. The multimillionaire, who lost a business of millions, will feel sorry, thinking that many people in the world could not pay their house payments. The upper-middle-class man will think that he was late with his payments, but others could not pay rent. That man who cannot pay rent can perhaps sleep at one of his relatives, but he will have enough to eat, and so the chain will be lowered to those who only think that they are fortunate to be alive.

For many others, the coronavirus affected much deeper and more painful issues. For some, the economic losses do not represent an important factor, but they lost a family member, or perhaps just that trip to reunite with their loved ones after years of separation, or even the opportunity to start that job they had dreamed of for years, the opportunity to start a new life project, to take the final step, that step to grow. We have all lost something in these months. We have all had our lives screwed up by the coronavirus.

The coronavirus took something away from me too, but I reserve it since it is up to human beings to find comfort. One has to think that thousands have died, that thousands have nothing to eat, that it could be worse, and yes, it can always be worse, which constantly leads us to self-pity. Self-pity is another way to resist, or perhaps the only way. To think that failure is momentary is an impulse. The universe is plagued by millions of human beings who have failed through their lives, but the dream of redemption, which we also know as hope, keeps them all going. Those who have hope may not achieve their dreams, but will reach old age, will have lived. In documentaries, films, novels, and history books, we will only know those who succeed, or at least, those who others consider having succeeded because one’ hell might be perceived by another as paradise from the outside, but time is always an enigma and opportunities do not necessarily recognize the right moment, so they just go away.

A couple of bureaucrats in China decided to make the world sick and subjugate humanity. This should lead us to reflect: the acts of one, two, three, four, perhaps ten individuals, can alter the course of humanity. The six degrees of separation has become evident. It is the theory of the whole, where the imprisonment of a doctor in Wuhan caused the death of a carpenter in Buenos Aires, where the negligence or complicity of a couple of Chinese scientists changed Alejandra life in Paris, Diego in Santiago, Janis in New York, Tomas in Caracas, and Bowen in Seoul.

The most important reflection is to understand, to internalize, that we cannot continue to turn a blind eye to totalitarianism, lies, the crushing of freedoms. We cannot continue to allow the proliferation of collectivist systems, governments that annul the truth because no matter how much we want to avoid it, the consequences could end up exploding in our faces one day, ruining our lives, or even worse, leading us to death.

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