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Mexico’s Ruling Party Holds Governor Seat in Coahuila Despite Vote Tampering Claims

By: Elena Toledo - @NenaToledo - Jun 9, 2017, 11:42 am
Coahuila
Electoral officials, having counted 90 percent of the ballots, said there were a total of about 1,264,000 votes cast, in which Riquelme defeated his closest contender Guillermo Anaya by 2.5 percent.(Twitter)

EspañolMexico’s Institutional Revolutionary Party has secured the governor’s seat in the state of Coahuila, as incumbent Miguel Riquelme took 482,534 votes to the conservative National Action Party’s Guillermo Anaya, who obtained 451,541 votes.

Electoral officials, having counted 90 percent of the ballots, said there were a total of about 1,264,000 votes cast, in which Riquelme defeated his closest contender Guillermo Anaya by 2.5 percent.

President of the Electoral Institute of Coahuila, Maria Gabriela de Leon, announced early on June 5 that PAN’s Anaya had pulled ahead in the quick count, but by Thursday, it was revealed the quick count had only looked at 71 percent of the vote, leaving enough votes to shift the election the other way.

Anaya’s party asked that the election results be annulled, but election official said they saw no reason to do so. Despite some ballot packages that were left open and thus at risk of being tampered with, they said they did not see reason enough to carry forward with a total annulment.

 

“There was a warning that in some boxes, citizens left ballots open, but they did not show any signs of violation or alteration, and, well, the regulations establish, as we did, that these packages are included in the total count,” one official said.

The packages were allegedly left opened with ballots inside, but officials said they verified that the number of votes inside the packages corresponded to the number of votes they had previously counted.

“That affirms for us that they were not tampered with,” one official said.

Source: Animal Político

Elena Toledo Elena Toledo

Educator by trade, social-media apprentice, activist for a democratic Honduras, and free thinker. Follow her on Twitter @NenaToledo.