Beatriz Becerra: The MEP Fighting for Freedom in Nicaragua and Venezuela

Beatriz Becerra has emerged as the voice of the Venezuelan and Nicaraguan opposition in European Parliament, and has called out her fellow Spaniards in Podemos who have long supported the Venezuelan dictatorship.

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MEP Beatriz Becerra has publicized the plight of the Venezuelan and Nicaraguan people, struggling against Communist dictatorship (Flickr).

By Josefina Blanco

Two days before the end of 2018, the MEP and vice president of the Human Rights subcommittee of the European Parliament, Beatriz Becerra, said through her Twitter account: “I promise to remain firm with Venezuela, accompanying their struggle to recover their freedom and future. Without getting tired or giving up.”

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Becerra pledged her support for the commitment of the Secretary General of the Organization of American States (OAS), Luis Almagro, to continue promoting all mechanisms to lift Venezuela out of the deep crisis in which Chavez and Nicolás Maduro have plunged the country.

“What we have gone through in 2018 seems much longer than a year. The crisis in Venezuela, far from being resolved, is becoming more serious, pressing and distressing, but know that I will continue by your side and not abandon you in this fight,” said Almagro on social networks.

While Almagro has been one of the great defenders of democracy in the Americas, denouncing first the dictatorship of Maduro and, now, that of Daniel Ortega in Nicaragua, his counterpart in Europe has been Becerra.

“Venezuela is suffering a multi-organ failure. The kidneys, the liver, the lungs, the heart are all failing. Electricity is rationed and rights are trampled. Medicines have disappeared from hospitals, and freedoms are under constant assault. Those who ask for food and those who ask for democracy are silenced. The Constitutional order has been overthrown. And when we denounce it and offer our help, do they still have the nerve to tell us to mind our own business?” Becerra said on May 22, 2016 in an speech before the European Parliament.

While this was one of her first pronouncements against the Venezuelan dictatorship, in November 2018 she began to publicly call attention to the crisis in Nicaragua, which began with a series of anti-government protests in April 2018, when she alleged that the Central American country was on the way to becoming the new Venezuela.

In fact, Ortega has followed the same Cuban recipe as his counterparts in Venezuela. At its heart, it involves repression using, in addition to the military and police forces, paramilitary groups, arbitrary arrests, torture, and disappearance.

“Cuba’s main export is its authoritarian model. The situation in Venezuela and the collapse in Nicaragua can not be explained without the role of the Cuban regime,” she said in a video in November 2018.

Her most recent call for democracy in Nicaragua was made on December 22nd. Becerra supported the request of the executive director of the Americas division of Human Rights Watch, José Miguel Vivanco, for OAS members to call a special session of the permanent council to support the conclusions of the Interdisciplinary Group of Independent Experts (GIEI) and condemn “with vehemence” the recent attacks on the press and NGOs in the Central American country.

Becerra requested that the high representative of the EU for Foreign Affairs, Federica Mogherini, the President of the EP, Antonio Tajani, and the President of the European Council, Donald Tusk, formulate “a firm and urgent position of condemnation with regard to the very serious events that are taking place in Nicaragua.”

On December 7, in a letter to Mogherini, Becerra asked the EU to refuse to recognize the legitimacy of Maduro’s next term:

On January 10 the current term of President Nicolás Maduro will expire. After abolishing all democratic institutions and indefinitely suspending the electoral processes established in the Constitution, a scenario now emerges where Venezuela has a “president” lacking in any political or Constitutional legitimacy.

Against Zapatero and Errejón

In addition, Becerra has worked hard to denounce her own compatriots who have supported the Venezuelan regime.

In February 2018, the MEP wrote an article in the Spanish newspaper El País, entitled “Zapatero’s open letter on Venezuela”, in response to a letter that the former president of that country addressed to the Venezuelan opposition blaming them for the failure of the last round of negotiations with the Maduro regime.

She did not mince her words:

“You are not a mediator: you work for one of the parties, for a government that, I remind you, has just withdrawn its ambassador from Spain creating a diplomatic crisis with our country, with his, Mr. Zapatero, of which you were president. You conveniently appear to ignore this fact, and the dictatorial nature of this regime?” Becerra wrote.

Recently, on December 21, in a series of tweets, Becerra answered Íñigo Errejón, Madrid deputy for the political party Podemos. The party has spent several years praising, defending, and advising the Chavista-Madurista regime, with lucrative fees to boot.

Errejón, wisely, has now changed his mind. He said in an interview with El Economista that “Venezuela is a disaster and is not a model for our country.”

“Your problem, Errejón, is that if Venezuela today is a disaster, it is also thanks to you and your party, accomplices of a dictatorial, corrupt, and ineffective regime,” Becerra said on her Twitter account.

Becerra ends by stating: “Your defense of Venezuela was indecent: if someone in Spain expressed their concern for Venezuela, you ridiculed them, merely because they were not addressing the problems in Spain.”

Becerra also took the opportunity to criticize the separatist strategy of Podemos that has generated a political crisis in Catalonia and in the country at large.

“Do you know what happens? You came to say that everything was rotten, that you had to demolish the constitutional ‘house’ and build another one. And there you go. It is only fair that we ask you about the specifics of your model” Becerra tweeted.

The MEP continues in her attack on Errejón, noting that “With great impudence, you have sometimes suggested that our model should be Denmark, as if the Nordic social-democratic model had been created by populists like you.”

“Your problem is that the only thing that you can offer to the Spaniards is Chavista Venezuela. And so it goes.”

That is the problem with the left that Becerra sees clearly. That intrinsic contradiction of an ideology that advocates an “equality” that is only achieved by blood and fire. A model that destroys everything in its wake. A political system that needs totalitarianism and repression to survive. A carbon copy of Cuba, a dictatorship that just celebrated its 60th anniversary after the seizure of power by Fidel Castro.

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